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image: PubPeer: Pathologist Threatening to Sue Users

PubPeer: Pathologist Threatening to Sue Users

By | September 22, 2014

The forum’s founders have obtained legal counsel and are preparing for the possibility of user information being subpoenaed as part of a lawsuit.

0 Comments

image: Peer Review of STAP Work Revealed

Peer Review of STAP Work Revealed

By | September 11, 2014

Early versions of two now-retracted stimulus-triggered acquisition of pluripotency studies had been rejected before.  

1 Comment

image: Opinion: An Ecclesiastical Approach to Peer Review

Opinion: An Ecclesiastical Approach to Peer Review

By | September 5, 2014

How early Christian teachings could improve scientific discourse

1 Comment

image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

3 Comments

image: How Long Is Too Long?

How Long Is Too Long?

By | August 27, 2014

Readers discuss the varied amounts of time they’ve waited for journals to respond to or act on their concerns regarding published papers.

2 Comments

image: PubPeer Threatened with Legal Action

PubPeer Threatened with Legal Action

By | August 19, 2014

The moderators of the post-publication peer review forum say they could be facing their first legal case.

2 Comments

image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

0 Comments

image: Retracted, Republished, but Not Re-reviewed

Retracted, Republished, but Not Re-reviewed

By | June 30, 2014

A once-retracted study about the health effects of GMO maize was not peer reviewed before it was republished, as its lead author claimed.

1 Comment

image: Retracted GMO Study Republished

Retracted GMO Study Republished

By | June 24, 2014

A controversial study that found health problems in rats exposed to genetically engineered maize returns to the scientific literature.

13 Comments

image: Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

Arrested Development Makes for Long-Lived Worms

By | June 23, 2014

Starvation suspends cellular activity in C. elegans larvae and extends their lifespan. 

0 Comments

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