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image: Preprints Galore

Preprints Galore

By | November 12, 2013

The research community sees the launch of a new life science–centric preprint server.

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image: Carp Breed in Great Lakes Watershed

Carp Breed in Great Lakes Watershed

By | October 29, 2013

New evidence indicates that invasive Asian carp have bred in the Lake Erie basin.

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image: EU Reels in Subsidies for Ocean Fisheries

EU Reels in Subsidies for Ocean Fisheries

By | October 25, 2013

The European Parliament rejected a proposal designed to fund the construction of new fishing boats, instead opting to fund a project that aims to curtail overfishing.

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image: Post-Publication Peer Review Mainstreamed

Post-Publication Peer Review Mainstreamed

By | October 22, 2013

The launch of PubMed Commons highlights the pros and cons of re-reviewing published papers. 

6 Comments

image: Useless Peer Review?

Useless Peer Review?

By | October 15, 2013

A study shows that the methods by which scientists evaluate each other’s work are error-prone and poor at measuring merit.

3 Comments

image: Fake Paper Exposes Failed Peer Review

Fake Paper Exposes Failed Peer Review

By | October 6, 2013

The widespread acceptance of an atrocious manuscript, fabricated by an investigative journalist, reveals the near absence of quality at some journals.

2 Comments

image: Influential Ecologist Dies

Influential Ecologist Dies

By | September 24, 2013

Ruth Patrick, who pioneered freshwater pollution monitoring, has passed away at age 105.

1 Comment

image: What to Do About “Clare Francis”

What to Do About “Clare Francis”

By | September 14, 2013

Anonymous tipsters who allege scientific misconduct can make journal editors squeamish. But should a whistleblower's identity matter?

7 Comments

image: Week in Review, July 22–26

Week in Review, July 22–26

By | July 26, 2013

Faux stem cells; X chromosome involved in sperm production; rewarding peer review; clues to flatworm regeneration; an ethereal glow signals death

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image: Dolphins by Name

Dolphins by Name

By | July 23, 2013

Bottlenose dolphins can recognize and respond to their own “signature whistles,” strengthening the evidence that these whistles function like names.

2 Comments

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