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image: Setbacks and Great Leaps

Setbacks and Great Leaps

By | April 1, 2015

The tale of p53, a widely studied tumor suppressor gene, illustrates the inventiveness of researchers who turn mishaps into discoveries.

1 Comment

image: The Challenges of Precision

The Challenges of Precision

By | April 1, 2015

Researchers face roadblocks to treating an individual patient’s cancer as a unique disease.

1 Comment

image: To Each His Own

To Each His Own

By | April 1, 2015

Cancer treatment becomes more and more personal.

0 Comments

image: Two-Faced RNAs

Two-Faced RNAs

By | April 1, 2015

The same microRNAs can have opposing roles in cancer.

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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

4 Comments

image: Resisting Cancer

Resisting Cancer

By | April 1, 2015

If one out of three people develops cancer, that means two others don’t. Understanding why could lead to insights relevant to prevention and treatment.

7 Comments

image: Hiding in Plain Sight

Hiding in Plain Sight

By | March 31, 2015

Researchers using metagenomics and single-cell sequencing identify a potential new bacterial phylum.

1 Comment

image: Fast-Track Peer Review Controversy

Fast-Track Peer Review Controversy

By | March 31, 2015

An editor of the journal Scientific Reports quits in protest of paid, expedited review.

4 Comments

image: Mass Retraction

Mass Retraction

By | March 27, 2015

BioMed Central retracts 43 papers it had been investigating for evidence of faked peer review.

1 Comment

image: Genome Nation

Genome Nation

By | March 27, 2015

Researchers perform whole-genome sequencing on roughly 1 percent of the Icelandic population.

0 Comments

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