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image: Gutless Worm

Gutless Worm

By | July 1, 2015

Meet the digestive tract–lacking oligochaete that has fueled Max Planck researcher Nicole Dubilier’s interest in symbiosis and marine science.

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image: Sold on Symbiosis

Sold on Symbiosis

By | July 1, 2015

A love of the ocean lured Nicole Dubilier into science; gutless sea worms and their nurturing bacterial symbionts keep her at the leading edge of marine microbiology.

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image: Sponging Up Phosphorus

Sponging Up Phosphorus

By | July 1, 2015

Symbiotic bacteria in Caribbean reef sponges store polyphosphate granules, possibly explaining why phosphorous is so scarce in coral reef ecosystems.

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image: The War Rages On

The War Rages On

By | July 1, 2015

Conflict between science and religion continues, with effects on health, politics, and the environment.

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image: The Sum of Our Parts

The Sum of Our Parts

By , and | July 1, 2015

Putting the microbiome front and center in health care, in preventive strategies, and in health-risk assessments could stem the epidemic of noncommunicable diseases.

10 Comments

image: Diagnosing Ebola in 15 Minutes

Diagnosing Ebola in 15 Minutes

By | June 30, 2015

A new test that scans for the Ebola virus with just a fingerprick could be a practical diagnostic for use in West Africa.

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image: Sex Differences in Pain Pathway

Sex Differences in Pain Pathway

By | June 29, 2015

Male and female mice utilize different immune cells to process pain, a study shows.

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image: Neutralizing HIV

Neutralizing HIV

By | June 18, 2015

Engineered immunogens based on conserved patches of the virus’s envelope protein point to new strategies for vaccine design.

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image: Brain Drain

Brain Drain

By | June 1, 2015

The brain contains lymphatic vessels similar to those found elsewhere in the body, a mouse study shows.

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In the prologue, “Lemurs and the Delights of Fieldwork,” author Ian Tattersall shares the paleoanthropological lessons he learned from studying non-human primates in Madagascar.

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