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In Chapter 3, “From Mating to Conception,” author Robert Martin explores the question of why humans and other primates frequently engage in sexual intercourse when females are not fertile.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | July 1, 2013

Denial, Probably Approximately Correct, Permanent Present Tense, and Against Their Will

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image: Widening the Fertile Window

Widening the Fertile Window

By | July 1, 2013

Women may be able to store viable sperm for longer than a week, thus contributing to apparent variability in pregnancy lengths.

1 Comment

image: Crowd Control

Crowd Control

By | July 1, 2013

Molecules, cells, or vertebrates—when individuals move and act as a single unit, surprisingly complex behaviors arise that hint at the origins of multicellularity.

7 Comments

image: Fungus-Fighting Genes

Fungus-Fighting Genes

By | June 27, 2013

Two genes from wild relatives of wheat could save domestic wheat from fungal destruction.

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image: Image of the Day: <em>E. coli</em> Hunter

Image of the Day: E. coli Hunter

By | June 27, 2013

The Shiga toxin may help E. coli survive predation by the protist Tetrahymena.

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image: Horse Genome Is Oldest Ever Sequenced

Horse Genome Is Oldest Ever Sequenced

By | June 26, 2013

By sequencing the genome of a 700,000-year-old horse, researchers have pushed back the time of DNA survival by almost an order of magnitude.

3 Comments

image: Bacterial DNA in Human Genomes

Bacterial DNA in Human Genomes

By | June 20, 2013

A new study finds strong evidence that bacteria can transfer genes into human genomes, especially in cancer cells.

6 Comments

image: Identifying Spurious Cancer Mutations

Identifying Spurious Cancer Mutations

By | June 19, 2013

Researchers reveal why analyses of cancer-causing mutations are riddled with false positives and demonstrate a new approach that eliminates the problem.

2 Comments

image: Supreme Court Nixes Patenting Human Genes

Supreme Court Nixes Patenting Human Genes

By | June 13, 2013

The Justices have decided that isolated sequences of human DNA are not eligible for patent protection, but rules that artificial sequences can be patented.  

4 Comments

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