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image: Animal Magnetism

Animal Magnetism

By | May 1, 2016

A photosensitive protein behind the retinas of cockroaches plays a role in light-dependent, directional magnetosensitivity.

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In the book's prologue, author Frans de Waal considers the intellectual impediments to studying animal intelligence.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2016

Sorting the Beef from the Bull, Cheats and Deceits, A Sea of Glass, and Following the Wild Bees

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image: To Each Animal Its Own Cognition

To Each Animal Its Own Cognition

By | May 1, 2016

The study of nonhuman intelligence is coming into its own as researchers realize the unique contexts in which distinct species learn and behave.

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image: Psychedelic Neuroimaging

Psychedelic Neuroimaging

By | April 13, 2016

“Ego dissolution,” and other things that happen to the human brain on LSD

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image: Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

Microglia Tamp Down Neurogenesis

By | April 7, 2016

The immune cells—known for clearing dead cells—also chew up live progenitors in neurogenic regions of mouse brains. 

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image: Toward Predicting Personalized Neural Responses

Toward Predicting Personalized Neural Responses

By | April 7, 2016

Analyzing resting brain scans, researchers can anticipate the brain activities of a person performing a range of tasks. 

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image: Visualizing Interpersonal Connection

Visualizing Interpersonal Connection

By | April 4, 2016

People are attracted to others whose emotions they feel they can easily understand, according to a neuroimaging study.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Serengeti Rules</em>

Book Excerpt from The Serengeti Rules

By | April 1, 2016

In the introduction to the book, author Sean B. Carroll draws the parallels between ecological and physiological maladies.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2016

Lab Girl, The Most Perfect Thing, Half-Earth, and Cosmosapiens

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