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image: Simplified Magnetogenetics

Simplified Magnetogenetics

By | March 25, 2016

A new technique allows researchers to rapidly and reversibly activate neurons with a magnetically sensitive protein.

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image: Book Review: <em>Personal Trials</em>

Book Review: Personal Trials

By | March 22, 2016

At first blush, do-it-yourself clinical trials seem pointless and reckless. But a deeper truth pervades the research and the patients who drive it forward.

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image: Recovering Lost Memories

Recovering Lost Memories

By | March 21, 2016

Researchers use optogenetics to induce recall in an Alzheimer’s mouse model, suggesting the disease may not destroy memories permanently.

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image: Observing Nascent Neurons in Action

Observing Nascent Neurons in Action

By | March 14, 2016

Scientists image the activity of adult-born neurons in the brains of waking mice, and reveal roles for the cells in learning and memory.

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image: Zika Infects Neural Progenitors

Zika Infects Neural Progenitors

By | March 4, 2016

Scientists provide a potential biological link between Zika virus infection and microcephaly.

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image: Brain Prize Winners Announced

Brain Prize Winners Announced

By | March 3, 2016

Three UK neuroscientists jointly win the €1 million European Brain Prize for their work on memory.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2016

Herding Hemingway's Cats, Hair: A Human History, Restless Creatures, and The Mind Club

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image: Christina Schmidt: Chronobiology Crusader

Christina Schmidt: Chronobiology Crusader

By | March 1, 2016

Research Fellow, Cyclotron Research Center, University of Liège. Age: 35

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: In Your Dreams

In Your Dreams

By | March 1, 2016

Understanding the sleeping brain may be the key to unlocking the secrets of the human mind.

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