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image: Bacteriophages to the Rescue

Bacteriophages to the Rescue

By | July 17, 2017

Phage therapy is but one example of using biological entities to reduce our reliance on antibiotics and other failing chemical solutions.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Natural Defense</em>

Book Excerpt from Natural Defense

By | July 17, 2017

In Chapter 3, “The Enemy of Our Enemy Is Our Friend: Infecting the Infection,” author Emily Monosson makes the case for bacteriophage therapy in the treatment of infectious disease.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | July 17, 2017

Meet some of the people featured in the July/August issue of The Scientist.

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image: DNA Origami

DNA Origami

By | July 17, 2017

Will complex, folded synthetic DNA molecules one day serve as capsules to deliver drugs to cancer cells?

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Using single-cell RNA sequencing, scientists characterize new populations of dendritic cells and monocytes.

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image: Your Body Is Teeming with Weed Receptors

Your Body Is Teeming with Weed Receptors

By | July 17, 2017

And the same endocannabinoid system that translates marijuana's buzz-inducing compounds into a high plays crucial roles in health and disease outside the brain.

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image: Endocannabinoids in the Groove

Endocannabinoids in the Groove

By | July 17, 2017

The system responsible for the buzz humans get from marijuana plays a passel of physiological roles outside the brain.

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image: Anti-Preeclampsia Hormone Discovered

Anti-Preeclampsia Hormone Discovered

By | June 29, 2017

A small, placenta-produced peptide fixes the pregnancy-related condition in mice. 

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image: T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

T Cells That Drive Toxic Shock in Mice Identified

By | June 20, 2017

Overzealous activity by mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells in response to bacterial toxins can lead to illness instead of stopping it.

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Research shows that human immunity develops much earlier than previously thought, but functions differently in adults.

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