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Contributors

By | April 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Setbacks and Great Leaps

Setbacks and Great Leaps

By | April 1, 2015

The tale of p53, a widely studied tumor suppressor gene, illustrates the inventiveness of researchers who turn mishaps into discoveries.

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image: From Many, One

From Many, One

By | April 1, 2015

Diverse mammals, including humans, have been found to carry distinct genomes in their cells. What does such genetic chimerism mean for health and disease?

4 Comments

image: Short, Strong Signals

Short, Strong Signals

By | March 25, 2015

Methylation increases both the activity and instability of the signaling protein Notch.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Galileo’s Middle Finger</em>

Book Excerpt from Galileo’s Middle Finger

By | March 10, 2015

In Chapter 4, “A Show-Me State of Mind,” author Alice Dreger describes the start of her journey studying scientists who had conducted controversial research.

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image: Stirring the Pot

Stirring the Pot

By | March 1, 2015

How to navigate the slings and arrows of conducting “controversial” research

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Women After All</em>

Book Excerpt from Women After All

By | February 2, 2015

In the introduction to his latest book, author Melvin Konner explains why he considers maleness a departure from normal physiology.

6 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2015

Touch, The Altruistic Brain, Is Shame Necessary?, and Future Arctic

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image: It’s Over, Man

It’s Over, Man

By | February 1, 2015

The era of human male domination is ending. Will modern culture welcome the dawn of a new gender equality?

7 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Creativity Crisis</em>

Book Excerpt from The Creativity Crisis

By | January 7, 2015

In Chapter 1, “Yin and Yang,” author Roberta B. Ness explores the dynamic tension between innovation and risk aversion in science past and present.

1 Comment

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