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image: Drunks and Monkeys

Drunks and Monkeys

By | June 1, 2014

Understanding our primate ancestors’ relationship with alcohol can inform its use by modern humans.  

5 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2014

Madness and Memory, Promoting the Planck Club, The Carnivore Way, and The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons

0 Comments

image: The Skin We’re In

The Skin We’re In

By | May 1, 2014

Beneath maladies of the skin lie psychosocial stigma and pain.

1 Comment

image: The Telltale Tail

The Telltale Tail

By | May 1, 2014

A symbiotic relationship between squid and bacteria provides an alternative explanation for bacterial sheathed flagella.

0 Comments

image: Women Receive Lab-Grown Vaginas

Women Receive Lab-Grown Vaginas

By | April 14, 2014

Doctors implant custom-made organs, built from a tissue sample and a biodegradable scaffold, into four female patients born with underdeveloped or missing vaginas.

1 Comment

image: Mapping Gene Expression in the Fetal Brain

Mapping Gene Expression in the Fetal Brain

By | April 2, 2014

Researchers complete an atlas depicting gene expression across the developing human brain.

1 Comment

image: Sloppy Notes Led to Goodall Plagiarism

Sloppy Notes Led to Goodall Plagiarism

By | April 1, 2014

Jane Goodall’s latest book was revised to eliminate plagiarism, which she blames on chaotic note-taking.  

0 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2014

Cancer Virus, A Window on Eternity, Murderous Minds, and The Extreme Life of the Sea

0 Comments

image: Dissecting Consciousness

Dissecting Consciousness

By | April 1, 2014

Theoretical physicist Michio Kaku describes his new theory of consciousness.

4 Comments

image: Future Minded

Future Minded

By | April 1, 2014

Imagine consciousness traveling at the speed of light.

2 Comments

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