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image: Sleep Tight

Sleep Tight

By | October 1, 2014

Bed bugs are but one example of a species whose populations have evolved in response to human behavior.

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Speaking of Vision Science

By | October 1, 2014

October 2014's selection of notable quotes

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Lagoon</em>

Book Excerpt from The Lagoon

By | September 1, 2014

Author Armand Marie Leroi reminisces about the shells that sparked his love of science.

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image: Aristotelian Biology

Aristotelian Biology

By | September 1, 2014

The ancient Greek philosopher was the first scientist.

4 Comments

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Capsule Reviews

By | September 1, 2014

An Indomitable Beast, What If?, Superintelligence, and Dataclysm

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Contributors

By | September 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the September issue of The Scientist.

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image: Precisely Placed

Precisely Placed

By | September 1, 2014

Vein patterns in the wings of developing fruit flies never vary by more than the width of a single cell.

3 Comments

image: Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

Crayfish Blood Cells Make New Neurons

By | August 13, 2014

Hemocytes can form neurons in adult crayfish, a study shows.

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image: Beyond Cat Killing

Beyond Cat Killing

By | August 1, 2014

Capsule reviewed author Ian Leslie sets up his latest book, Curious, about the human propensity to wonder and learn.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Shocked</em>

Book Excerpt from Shocked

By | August 1, 2014

In Chapter 4, “Science fiction, space travel, and the strange science of suspended animation,” author David Casarett describes his brush with adenosine monophosphate and reanimated mice.

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