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image: Is Earth Special?

Is Earth Special?

By | March 1, 2014

Reconsidering the uniqueness of life on our planet

8 Comments

image: Neural Target for Autism?

Neural Target for Autism?

By | February 7, 2014

Mouse and rat models of the developmental disorder responded positively to a drug given to their mothers a day before birth.

0 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Buddhist Biology</em>

Book Excerpt from Buddhist Biology

By | February 1, 2014

In Chapter 1, “A Science Sutra,” author David Barash describes how the ancient philosophy might form the perfect link between science and religion.

11 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2014

Me, Myself, and Why, RedDevil 4, Neanderthal Man, and Science from Sight to Insight

0 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | February 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Meiosis Maven

Meiosis Maven

By | February 1, 2014

Fueled by her love of visual data and addicted to chromosomes, Abby Dernburg continues to study how homologous chromosomes find each other during gamete formation.

1 Comment

image: Unmasking Secret Identities

Unmasking Secret Identities

By | February 1, 2014

A tour of techniques for measuring DNA hydroxymethylation

2 Comments

image: Fish of Many Colors

Fish of Many Colors

By | January 23, 2014

Researchers seek insight into the pigmentation patterns of guppies and zebrafish.

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image: Week in Review: January 6–10

Week in Review: January 6–10

By | January 10, 2014

Bacterial genes aid tubeworm settling; pigmentation of ancient reptiles; nascent neurons and vertebrate development; exploring simple synapses; slug-inspired surgical glue

0 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from The Monkey’s Voyage

Book Excerpt from The Monkey’s Voyage

By | January 1, 2014

In Chapter 7, “The Green Web,” author Alan de Queiroz describes the evolutionary journey taken by a South American species of sundew plant.

0 Comments

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