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image: All In Proportion

All In Proportion

By | March 2, 2013

Drosophila insulin-like peptides (dILPs) regulate part of the signaling pathway that helps keep organs growing in proportion during development.

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image: Book Excerpt from The Murder of Cleopatra

Book Excerpt from The Murder of Cleopatra

By | March 1, 2013

In Chapter 1, “The Coldest Case,” author and criminal profiler Pat Brown sets the scene for her quest to prove that the Egyptian queen did not commit suicide.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2013

The Undead, Frankenstein's Cat, The Universe Within, and Physics in Mind

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | March 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the March 2013 issue of The Scientist.

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image: CSI: Ancient Alexandria

CSI: Ancient Alexandria

By | March 1, 2013

A reexamination of the facts surrounding the death of Cleopatra VII reveals that the Egyptian queen was murdered—and not by an asp.

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image: Instant Messaging

Instant Messaging

By | March 1, 2013

During development, communication between organs determines their relative final size.

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image: Book Excerpt from A#@holes

Book Excerpt from A#@holes

By | February 4, 2013

In Chapter 1, “A Theory,” author Aaron James constructs a working definition for the type of person that earns the ignominious moniker.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2013

The Science of Love, Bad Pharma, Genes, Cells and Brains, and Nature Wars

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image: Fellow Travelers

Fellow Travelers

By | February 1, 2013

Collective cell migration relies on a directional signal that comes from the moving cluster, rather than from external cues.

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image: Go Forth, Cells

Go Forth, Cells

By | February 1, 2013

Watch the cell transplant experiments in zebrafish that suggest certain embryonic cells rely on intrinsic directional cues for collective migration.

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