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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Serengeti Rules</em>

Book Excerpt from The Serengeti Rules

By | April 1, 2016

In the introduction to the book, author Sean B. Carroll draws the parallels between ecological and physiological maladies.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2016

Lab Girl, The Most Perfect Thing, Half-Earth, and Cosmosapiens

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image: Guts and Glory

Guts and Glory

By | April 1, 2016

An open mind and collaborative spirit have taken Hans Clevers on a journey from medicine to developmental biology, gastroenterology, cancer, and stem cells.

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image: Book Review: <em>Personal Trials</em>

Book Review: Personal Trials

By | March 22, 2016

At first blush, do-it-yourself clinical trials seem pointless and reckless. But a deeper truth pervades the research and the patients who drive it forward.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | March 1, 2016

Herding Hemingway's Cats, Hair: A Human History, Restless Creatures, and The Mind Club

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image: In Your Dreams

In Your Dreams

By | March 1, 2016

Understanding the sleeping brain may be the key to unlocking the secrets of the human mind.

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image: Adjustable Brain Cells

Adjustable Brain Cells

By | February 18, 2016

Neighboring neurons can manipulate astrocytes. 

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2016

What Should a Clever Moose Eat?, The Illusion of God's Presence, GMO Sapiens, and Why We Snap

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | December 1, 2015

Welcome to the Microbiome, The Paradox of Evolution, Newton's Apple, and Dawn of the Neuron.

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image: The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

The Cyclopes of Idaho, 1950s

By | December 1, 2015

A rash of deformed lambs eventually led to the creation of a cancer-fighting agent.

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