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Harvesting lab-raised zebrafish based on their size led to differences in the activity of more than 4,000 genes, as well as changes in allele frequencies of those genes, in the fish that remained.

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image: More Details on How Pesticides Harm Bees

More Details on How Pesticides Harm Bees

By | May 3, 2017

Scientists report that thiamethoxam exposure impairs bumblebees’ reproduction and honey bees’ ability to fly.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Flavor</em>

Book Excerpt from Flavor

By | May 1, 2017

Author Bob Holmes dove into the taste-determining realm of his genome.

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image: Why I Had My Sense of Flavor Genotyped

Why I Had My Sense of Flavor Genotyped

By | May 1, 2017

One person’s quest to get to the bottom of the unique way he experiences food

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From fish harvests to cottonwood forests, organisms display evidence that species change can occur on timescales that can influence ecological processes.

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Guppies transplanted between different communities in Trinidadian streams evolved in response to changes in predation threat in just a few generations.

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image: Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

Migratory Eels Use Magnetoreception

By | April 14, 2017

In laboratory experiments that simulated oceanic conditions, the fish responded to magnetic fields, a sensory input that may aid migration.

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image: Singing Through Tone Deafness

Singing Through Tone Deafness

By | March 17, 2017

Author Tim Falconer didn't take his congenital amusia lying down. With the help of neuroscientists and vocal coaches, he tried to teach himself to sing against all odds.

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image: How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine

How Bad Singing Landed Me in an MRI Machine

By | March 1, 2017

One author's journey through the science of his congenital amusia

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image: Image of the Day: Noisy Barriers

Image of the Day: Noisy Barriers

By | February 2, 2017

Traffic noise disrupts communication between dwarf mongooses and tree squirrels, according to a study.

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