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image: Single-Celled Life Primed to Go Multicellular

Single-Celled Life Primed to Go Multicellular

By | October 17, 2016

The unicellular ancestor of animals may have harbored some of the molecular tools that its many-celled descendants use to coordinate and direct cell differentiation and function, scientists show.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>An Essay on Science and Narcissism</em>

Book Excerpt from An Essay on Science and Narcissism

By | October 1, 2016

In Chapter 3, "Determining Narcissism in Science with Real-Life Examples," author Bruno Lemaitre considers Niels Jerne.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | October 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the October 2016 issue of The Scientist

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image: The Narcissistic Scientist

The Narcissistic Scientist

By | October 1, 2016

Are leading researchers driven more by the quest for knowledge or the pursuit of fame?

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image: How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine

How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine

By | September 21, 2016

Caffeine-producing plants use three different biochemical pathways and two different enzyme families to make the same molecule.

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image: Stingrays Chew Too

Stingrays Chew Too

By | September 15, 2016

Researchers observe stingrays moving their jaws to grind up prey, a behavior thought to be restricted to mammals.

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image: Week in Review: September 5–9

Week in Review: September 5–9

By | September 9, 2016

Environmental magnetite in the human brain; prion structure takes shape; watching E. coli evolve in real time; learning from others’ behavior 

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image: Giant Petri Dish Displays Evolution in Space and Time

Giant Petri Dish Displays Evolution in Space and Time

By | September 8, 2016

As E. coli bacteria spread over increasingly concentrated antibiotics, researchers discover novel evolutionary pathways that confer resistance.

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In Chapter 13, “Why Is Reductionism Successful in Art?” author Eric Kandel explores what about abstract art challenges the human brain.

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image: How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

How Art Can Inform Brain Science, and Vice Versa

By | September 1, 2016

Reductionism may be the key to bridging the gap between the humanities and the sciences.

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