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Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2016

What Should a Clever Moose Eat?, The Illusion of God's Presence, GMO Sapiens, and Why We Snap

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | December 1, 2015

Welcome to the Microbiome, The Paradox of Evolution, Newton's Apple, and Dawn of the Neuron.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2015

The Psychology of Overeating, The Hidden Half of Nature, The Death of Cancer, and The Secret of Our Success

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Capsule Reviews

By | September 1, 2015

Brain Storms, Orphan, Maize for the Gods, and Paranoid.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Life on the Edge</em>

Book Excerpt from Life on the Edge

By | August 1, 2015

In Chapter 4, “The quantum beat,” authors Johnjoe McFadden and Jim Al-Khalili rethink Newton’s apple from a quantum-biological perspective.

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Capsule Reviews

By | August 1, 2015

Gods of the Morning, Hedonic Eating, A Beautiful Question, and Genomic Messages

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image: Good Vibrations

Good Vibrations

By | August 1, 2015

Does a delicately orchestrated balance between quantum and classical physics distinguish living from nonliving things?

15 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>Faith vs. Fact</em>

Book Excerpt from Faith vs. Fact

By | July 1, 2015

In Chapter 1, “The Problem,” author Jerry Coyne sets the historical stage for his suggestion that science and religion are not compatible and never will be.

2 Comments

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Capsule Reviews

By | July 1, 2015

Stoned, Anxious, The Deeper Genome, and Testosterone

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Contributors

By | July 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the July 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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