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image: Book Excerpt from <em>p53</em>

Book Excerpt from p53

By | April 1, 2015

In Chapter 12, "Of Mice and Men," author Sue Armstrong recounts the point at which researchers moved from working with p53 in tissue culture to studying the gene in animal models.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2015

Junk DNA, Cuckoo, Sapiens, and Cool

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image: Setbacks and Great Leaps

Setbacks and Great Leaps

By | April 1, 2015

The tale of p53, a widely studied tumor suppressor gene, illustrates the inventiveness of researchers who turn mishaps into discoveries.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Galileo’s Middle Finger</em>

Book Excerpt from Galileo’s Middle Finger

By | March 10, 2015

In Chapter 4, “A Show-Me State of Mind,” author Alice Dreger describes the start of her journey studying scientists who had conducted controversial research.

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image: Stirring the Pot

Stirring the Pot

By | March 1, 2015

How to navigate the slings and arrows of conducting “controversial” research

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Women After All</em>

Book Excerpt from Women After All

By | February 2, 2015

In the introduction to his latest book, author Melvin Konner explains why he considers maleness a departure from normal physiology.

6 Comments

image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2015

Touch, The Altruistic Brain, Is Shame Necessary?, and Future Arctic

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image: It’s Over, Man

It’s Over, Man

By | February 1, 2015

The era of human male domination is ending. Will modern culture welcome the dawn of a new gender equality?

7 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Creativity Crisis</em>

Book Excerpt from The Creativity Crisis

By | January 7, 2015

In Chapter 1, “Yin and Yang,” author Roberta B. Ness explores the dynamic tension between innovation and risk aversion in science past and present.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | January 1, 2015

Does Altruism Exist?, Ancestors in Our Genome, Fred Sanger—Double Nobel Laureate, and Stiffs, Skulls & Skeletons

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