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image: 2012 Labbies Honorable Mentions

2012 Labbies Honorable Mentions

By | October 1, 2012

Check out other memorable images and videos that were submitted to this year’s Labby Multimedia Awards.


image: Surviving Acidity

Surviving Acidity

By | September 25, 2012

A new study reveals clues to the naked mole-rat’s ability to thrive in underground environments with high levels of carbon dioxide.


image: A Good Night’s Sleep

A Good Night’s Sleep

By | September 1, 2012

Sleep-wake cycles affect how well our bodies fight disease.


image: The Danger of Vaccine Exemptions

The Danger of Vaccine Exemptions

By | August 30, 2012

Are states with less rigorous rules about which children can claim an exception from vaccination in kindergarten putting communities at higher risk of childhood disease?


image: Clinical Trial Misfortune

Clinical Trial Misfortune

By | August 28, 2012

A human trial of a hepatitis C treatment is shut down after one of the participants died.

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image: Cancer-Causing Gut Bacteria

Cancer-Causing Gut Bacteria

By | August 17, 2012

Mice with inflammatory bowel disease harbor gut bacteria that damage host DNA, predisposing mice to cancer.

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image: Immunologist Falsified Data

Immunologist Falsified Data

By | August 6, 2012

A researcher from the John Wayne Cancer Institute has settled his scientific misconduct case with the Office of Research Integrity.


image: Lymphatic Lines

Lymphatic Lines

By | August 1, 2012

Lymphatic vessels grow towards two chemokines, revealing signals that could be important in cancer metastasis.


image: Skin Microbes Alter Immunity

Skin Microbes Alter Immunity

By | July 30, 2012

Like commensal gut organisms, skin microbiota appear to help the mammalian immune system mature and stay regulated.


image: Lowering Carbon with Algae

Lowering Carbon with Algae

By | July 18, 2012

Spawning algal blooms by fertilizing the Southern Ocean with iron could help sink atmospheric carbon to the deep ocean—and maybe slow the course of climate change.


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