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image: Lowering Carbon with Algae

Lowering Carbon with Algae

By | July 18, 2012

Spawning algal blooms by fertilizing the Southern Ocean with iron could help sink atmospheric carbon to the deep ocean—and maybe slow the course of climate change.

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image: West Coast Marine Threat

West Coast Marine Threat

By | June 18, 2012

Rising ocean acidity along the California coast may wreak havoc in the region’s oyster populations.

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image: A Greener Arctic

A Greener Arctic

By | June 11, 2012

Algal blooms are appearing under the ice in the Arctic Ocean in areas thought to receive too little light to support photosynthetic life.

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image: Digging the Underground Life

Digging the Underground Life

By | June 1, 2012

A rare peek inside the subterranean home of the naked mole-rat

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image: Pain Free

Pain Free

By | June 1, 2012

One of the naked mole-rat’s amazing qualities is the reduced ability to feel certain kinds of pain.

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image: Underground Supermodels

Underground Supermodels

By | June 1, 2012

What can a twentysomething naked mole-rat tell us about fighting pain, cancer, and aging?

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image: From the Ground Up

From the Ground Up

By | August 1, 2011

As the planet warms plant growth will likely increase—locking up some of that extra carbon dioxide by converting it into vegetative biomass—but that’s not the whole story. 

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image: The Root of the Problem

The Root of the Problem

By | August 1, 2011

New research suggests that the flow of carbon through plants to underground ecosystems may be crucial to how the environment responds to climate change.

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