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image: Protein or Perish

Protein or Perish

By | September 1, 2016

A bacteriophage must evolve certain variants of a protein or die.

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image: One Receptor, Two Ligands, Different Responses

One Receptor, Two Ligands, Different Responses

By | August 31, 2016

Host and bacterial ligands that interact with the same cell-surface receptor induce different activities in human macrophages. 

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image: Extinct River Dolphin Species Discovered

Extinct River Dolphin Species Discovered

By | August 16, 2016

Overlooked for half a century, a skull in the Smithsonian collection points to a dolphin species that lived 25 million years ago, according to a study.

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image: Using RNA to Amplify RNA

Using RNA to Amplify RNA

By | August 15, 2016

Researchers apply in vitro evolution to generate an RNA enzyme capable of copying and amplifying RNA.

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image: Macrophages Respond to Liver Injury

Macrophages Respond to Liver Injury

By | August 1, 2016

In mice, immune cells from the body cavity surrounding organs arrive at the site of damage to chew up the nuclei of dead cells.

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image: Nailing Down HAR Function

Nailing Down HAR Function

By | August 1, 2016

A remaining challenge in the study of human accelerated regions (HARs) is establishing their specific functions during development and other biological processes.

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image: Newly Discovered Emergency Responders to Liver Damage

Newly Discovered Emergency Responders to Liver Damage

By | August 1, 2016

Immune cells called macrophages from the peritoneal cavity of mice migrate to injured livers and aid in repair.

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image: On Becoming Human

On Becoming Human

By | August 1, 2016

Some thoughts on going to the Galápagos

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image: Opinion: Monogamy and Cooperation Are Connected Through Multiple Links

Opinion: Monogamy and Cooperation Are Connected Through Multiple Links

By and | August 1, 2016

Why does cooperation evolve most often in monogamous animals?

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image: Opinion: Our Inner Caveman

Opinion: Our Inner Caveman

By | August 1, 2016

The modern human brain evolved in social and environmental settings very unlike today’s. Despite our cultural and technological progress, tribal instincts remain.

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