The Scientist

» obituary and microbiology

Most Recent

Thirty percent of bacteria found in babies' guts came from mothers' milk, a study finds.

1 Comment

image: Warmer Temps Tied to Altered Microbiome in Lizards

Warmer Temps Tied to Altered Microbiome in Lizards

By | May 8, 2017

Bacterial differences after three-month temperature hikes, modeled after global warming predictions, were evident one year later, a study found.

1 Comment

image: Developer of Amniocentesis Dies

Developer of Amniocentesis Dies

By | May 4, 2017

John Littlefield pioneered the use of the prenatal testing method in diagnosing genetic disorders in the womb.

0 Comments

image: Polio Vaccine Pioneer Dies

Polio Vaccine Pioneer Dies

By | May 2, 2017

Julius Youngner collaborated with Jonas Salk on the polio vaccine, and later identified interferon gamma and contributed to an equine influenza vaccine.

0 Comments

image: Future Homes May Have Bioreactive Walls

Future Homes May Have Bioreactive Walls

By | May 1, 2017

Researchers are redesigning the humble brick to produce electricity, to clean water and air, and to harvest valuable compounds.

0 Comments

The giant lizards have numerous microbicidal compounds in their blood.

0 Comments

image: Pioneering HIV Researcher Dies

Pioneering HIV Researcher Dies

By | April 13, 2017

Mark Wainberg, a professor of biology and virology at McGill University, has passed away unexpectedly at age 71.

0 Comments

A mouse study reveals a causal link between changes in intestinal microbiota and increasing inflammation as the rodents age.

0 Comments

Mice exposed to low doses of penicillin in utero or as young pups exhibited long-term behavioral differences not seen in their non-exposed counterparts, according to a study.

0 Comments

Recolonizing middle-aged animals with bacteria from younger ones kept killifish alive longer than usual, researchers report.

0 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Major German Universities Cancel Elsevier Contracts
  2. Running on Empty
    Features Running on Empty

    Regularly taking breaks from eating—for hours or days—can trigger changes both expected, such as in metabolic dynamics and inflammation, and surprising, as in immune system function and cancer progression.

  3. Most of Human Genome Nonfunctional: Study
  4. Identifying Predatory Publishers
AAAS