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Notable Science Quotes

By | December 1, 2016

The importance of science innovation, publishing and gender, and more

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Different assays lead to opposing conclusions on bacterial spores’ requirements during germination.

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A new literature review finds that even if babies born via Cesarean section have long-term health risks, as a number of past studies purport, it may not be a result of the procedure itself.

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Obesity-associated microbiome composition can persist after weight loss, affecting the exchange of metabolites between a mouse and its resident bugs, researchers report.

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image: Bacteria Show Signs of Starvation in Space

Bacteria Show Signs of Starvation in Space

By | November 18, 2016

E. coli cultured on the International Space Station show increased expression of genes related to starvation and acid-resistance responses, researchers report.

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Influential Organic Chemist Dies

By | November 7, 2016

John Roberts, the MIT and Caltech researcher who pioneered nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy as a tool to elucidate molecular structure, has passed away.

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image: Science Advocate, Climate Change Authority Dies

Science Advocate, Climate Change Authority Dies

By | November 7, 2016

Ralph Cicerone, former president of the National Academy of Sciences, has passed away at age 73.

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image: Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

Antarctic Bacteria Latch Onto Ice with Molecular Fishing Rod

By | November 1, 2016

Researchers describe the first known bacterial adhesion molecule that binds to frozen water. 

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Contributors

By | November 1, 2016

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2016 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Viruses of the Human Body

Viruses of the Human Body

By | November 1, 2016

Some of our resident viruses may be beneficial.

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