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image: The Human Virome

The Human Virome

By | November 1, 2016

Diverse viruses can be found commingling with human and bacteria cells in and on people’s bodies. Scientists are just beginning to understand how these viruses help and when they can turn pathogenic.

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image: Protein Folding Pioneer Dies

Protein Folding Pioneer Dies

By | October 28, 2016

Susan Lindquist of MIT and the Whitehead Institute broke scientific ground on prions and heat shock proteins.

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image: Week in Review: October 24–28

Week in Review: October 24–28

By | October 27, 2016

Patient Zero exonerated; Jack Woodall dies; Wolbachia-harboring mosquitoes deployed in fight against Zika; implanted neurons function in adult mouse brain 

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image: Public Health Leader Dies

Public Health Leader Dies

By | October 26, 2016

Jack Woodall, an epidemiologist and former columnist at The Scientist, cofounded the infectious disease outbreak reporting system ProMED. 

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image: Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

Deep-Sea Viruses Destroy Archaea

By | October 12, 2016

Viruses are responsible for the majority of archaea deaths on the deep ocean floors, scientists show.

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image: Alzheimer’s Immunotherapy Pioneer Dies

Alzheimer’s Immunotherapy Pioneer Dies

By | October 11, 2016

Dale Schenk, who worked to develop a vaccine for Alzheimer’s disease, has passed away at age 59.

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image: Plant Biologist Killed in Ethiopian Protest

Plant Biologist Killed in Ethiopian Protest

By | October 6, 2016

Stone throwers hit the car Sharon Gray was riding in while visiting the country for a meeting.

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image: Influential Alzheimer’s Researcher Dies

Influential Alzheimer’s Researcher Dies

By | October 6, 2016

Allen Roses, a professor of neurobiology at Duke University School of Medicine, has passed away at age 73.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | October 1, 2016

Roger Tsien R.I.P., predatory publishing, and diversity in science

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image: Bacteria and Humans Have Been Swapping DNA for Millennia

Bacteria and Humans Have Been Swapping DNA for Millennia

By | October 1, 2016

Bacteria inhabit most tissues in the human body, and genes from some of these microbes have made their way to the human genome. Could this genetic transfer contribute to diseases such as cancer?

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