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image: Famed Pediatric Endocrinologist Dies

Famed Pediatric Endocrinologist Dies

By | December 6, 2016

Melvin Grumbach, a clinician and researcher who described the hormonal dynamics of puberty and numerous endocrine disorders, has passed away at age 90.

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image: USC Professor Fatally Stabbed

USC Professor Fatally Stabbed

By | December 5, 2016

Psychologist Bosco Tjan of the University of Southern California studied how people adapt as they lose their vision.  

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image: Former NSF Director Dies

Former NSF Director Dies

By | December 5, 2016

Erich Bloch, a Holocaust refugee who rose to prominence as director of the National Science Foundation, has passed away at age 91.

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image: Famed Mammalian Embryologist Dies

Famed Mammalian Embryologist Dies

By | December 2, 2016

Andrzej Tarkowski’s research laid the groundwork for future advances in cloning, stem cell research, and in vitro fertilization.

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image: Gut Microbes Linked to Neurodegenerative Disease

Gut Microbes Linked to Neurodegenerative Disease

By | December 1, 2016

Bacteria in the intestine influence motor dysfunction and neuroinflammation in a mouse model of Parkinson’s disease.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | December 1, 2016

The importance of science innovation, publishing and gender, and more

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Different assays lead to opposing conclusions on bacterial spores’ requirements during germination.

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A new literature review finds that even if babies born via Cesarean section have long-term health risks, as a number of past studies purport, it may not be a result of the procedure itself.

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Obesity-associated microbiome composition can persist after weight loss, affecting the exchange of metabolites between a mouse and its resident bugs, researchers report.

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image: Bacteria Show Signs of Starvation in Space

Bacteria Show Signs of Starvation in Space

By | November 18, 2016

E. coli cultured on the International Space Station show increased expression of genes related to starvation and acid-resistance responses, researchers report.

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