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image: Algal Toxin Hurts Sea Lion Memory

Algal Toxin Hurts Sea Lion Memory

By | December 16, 2015

Results could explain why the marine mammals have been stranding on the West coast in record numbers.

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image: Eminent Cancer Researcher Dies

Eminent Cancer Researcher Dies

By | December 16, 2015

Indiana University’s David Flockhart, a pioneer of personalized medicine, has passed away at age 63. 

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image: Complications of Brain Manipulations

Complications of Brain Manipulations

By | December 9, 2015

The complex connectivities of mammalian and avian brains can confound the outcomes of transient neural manipulations, researchers show.

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image: Science Historian Dies

Science Historian Dies

By | December 9, 2015

Lisa Jardine, former chair of the U.K.’s Human Fertilization and Embryology Authority, has passed away at age 71.

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image: Esteemed Virologist Dies

Esteemed Virologist Dies

By | December 7, 2015

Richard Johnson, a pioneer in research on central nervous system infections, died last month at age 84.

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image: Leader in Biomechanics Dies

Leader in Biomechanics Dies

By | December 1, 2015

Duke’s Steven Vogel studied how plants and animals adapt to the physical world.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | December 1, 2015

Welcome to the Microbiome, The Paradox of Evolution, Newton's Apple, and Dawn of the Neuron.

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image: BRCA1 Linked to Alzheimer’s

BRCA1 Linked to Alzheimer’s

By | November 30, 2015

The cancer-related protein BRCA1 is important for learning and memory in mice and is depleted in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients, according to a study.

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image: Cortical Census

Cortical Census

By | November 26, 2015

Scientists document the characteristics and connections of mouse neocortical neurons to establish the most detailed microcircuit map to date.

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image: Gut Bugs to Brain: You’re Stuffed

Gut Bugs to Brain: You’re Stuffed

By | November 24, 2015

Bacteria in the intestine produce proteins that stop rodents from eating.

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