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image: Notable Young Neuroscientist Dies

Notable Young Neuroscientist Dies

By | February 18, 2015

Xu Liu, who used optogenetics to manipulate memories in mice, has passed away at age 37.

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image: Neuroscience of Marijuana Munchies

Neuroscience of Marijuana Munchies

By | February 18, 2015

Cannabinoids cause appetite-suppressing neurons to produce an appetite-stimulating hormone in mice.

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image: “Inner GPS” Support

“Inner GPS” Support

By | February 5, 2015

Grid cells—the neurons that function as a spatial navigation system—require input from another set of neurons, a rat study shows.

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image: Long-Lived Immunotherapy Stem Cells

Long-Lived Immunotherapy Stem Cells

By | February 4, 2015

Genetically modified T memory stem cells persist in patients for more than 10 years, and can differentiate into a variety of T cell types.

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image: Influential Chemist Dies

Influential Chemist Dies

By | February 2, 2015

Carl Djerassi, who synthesized a hormone that was key to the creation of the birth control pill, has passed away at age 91.

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image: B Cell Bosses

B Cell Bosses

By | February 1, 2015

Gut bacteria in mice spur regulatory B cells to differentiate and release an anti-inflammatory cytokine.

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image: Bouncing Back

Bouncing Back

By | February 1, 2015

In mice, a transcriptional regulator, β-catenin, activates a microRNA-processing pathway in the nucleus accumbens to promote resilience to social stress.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2015

Touch, The Altruistic Brain, Is Shame Necessary?, and Future Arctic

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image: Stubbornly Persistent

Stubbornly Persistent

By | February 1, 2015

Microorganisms continually challenge our assumptions of what life can achieve.

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image: Thanks for the Memories

Thanks for the Memories

By | February 1, 2015

B and T cells may be the memory masters of the immune system, but research reveals that other cells can be primed by pathogens, too.

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