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image: Doctor Who Blocked Thalidomide Dies

Doctor Who Blocked Thalidomide Dies

By | August 11, 2015

Frances Oldham Kelsey, a physician who halted use of a drug that caused birth defects in babies, has passed away at age 101.

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image: Rethinking Lymphatic Development

Rethinking Lymphatic Development

By | August 1, 2015

Four studies identify alternative origins for cells of the developing lymphatic system, challenging the long-standing view that they all come from veins.

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image: The Human Touch

The Human Touch

By | August 1, 2015

Can mice with humanlike tissues better model drug effects in people?

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image: The Spleen Collectors

The Spleen Collectors

By | August 1, 2015

Donated organs are helping researchers map out the immune system in humans.

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image: Yun “Nancy” Huang: Eager for Epigenetics

Yun “Nancy” Huang: Eager for Epigenetics

By | August 1, 2015

Assistant Professor, Institute of Biosciences and Technology, Texas A&M Health Science Center, Houston. Age: 35

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image: Pioneering Obesity Researcher Dies

Pioneering Obesity Researcher Dies

By | July 31, 2015

Jules Hirsch, who described the link between body weight and metabolism, has died at age 88.

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image: NK Cell Diversity and Viral Risk

NK Cell Diversity and Viral Risk

By | July 22, 2015

A small study links the diversity of a person’s natural killer cell repertoire to risk of HIV infection following exposure to the virus.

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image: Renowned Paleontologist Dies

Renowned Paleontologist Dies

By | July 16, 2015

David Raup, whose contributions to paleontology fundamentally changed the field, has passed away at 82.

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image: Novel Hantavirus Infection Method

Novel Hantavirus Infection Method

By | July 3, 2015

Researchers find that the potentially deadly virus uses cholesterol to gain access to cells.

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image: Brrrr-ying the Results

Brrrr-ying the Results

By | July 1, 2015

Holding laboratory mice at temperatures lower than those the animals prefer could be altering their physiology and skewing experimental results.

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