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image: Crystallography Innovator Dies

Crystallography Innovator Dies

By | June 26, 2017

Philip Coppens, who developed photocrystallography, has passed away at age 86.

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image: Gut Feeling

Gut Feeling

By | June 22, 2017

Sensory cells of the mouse intestine let the brain know if certain compounds are present by speaking directly to gut neurons via serotonin.

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image: Sex Reversal Mystery Explained?

Sex Reversal Mystery Explained?

By | June 15, 2017

A proposed mechanism for how bearded dragons with male chromosomes hatch as females at high temperatures

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image: Distinguished Autism Researcher Dies

Distinguished Autism Researcher Dies

By | June 13, 2017

A child neurologist, Isabelle Rapin popularized the notion that autism was part of a spectrum of disorders.

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The new findings, obtained from cell culture experiments, could explain the link between infection with the virus during pregnancy and infant microcephaly.

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image: How Statistics Weakened mRNA’s Predictive Power

How Statistics Weakened mRNA’s Predictive Power

By | May 22, 2017

Transcript abundance isn’t a reliable indicator of protein quantity, contrary to studies’ suggestions. 

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image: Former Head of Genzyme Dies

Former Head of Genzyme Dies

By | May 15, 2017

Henri Termeer helped usher the biotech company into an industry behemoth.

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image: The RNA Age: A Primer

The RNA Age: A Primer

By | May 11, 2017

Our guide to all known forms of RNA, from cis-NAT to vault RNA and everything in between.

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image: Developer of Amniocentesis Dies

Developer of Amniocentesis Dies

By | May 4, 2017

John Littlefield pioneered the use of the prenatal testing method in diagnosing genetic disorders in the womb.

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image: Polio Vaccine Pioneer Dies

Polio Vaccine Pioneer Dies

By | May 2, 2017

Julius Youngner collaborated with Jonas Salk on the polio vaccine, and later identified interferon gamma and contributed to an equine influenza vaccine.

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