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image: Unknown Protein Structures Predicted

Unknown Protein Structures Predicted

By | January 19, 2017

Metagenomic sequence data boosts the power of protein modeling software to yield hundreds of new protein structure predictions.

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image: Replication Complications

Replication Complications

By | January 18, 2017

An initiative to replicate key findings in cancer biology yields a preliminary conclusion: it’s difficult.

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Clostridium botulinum produces a transcription factor that can aggregate and self-propagate a prion-like form, leading to genome-wide changes in gene expression in E. coli, according to a study.

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The Nobel laureate and Lasker awardee developed tools that facilitated decades of genetics research, including starch gel electrophoresis and gene targeting.

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A team of scientists was unable to replicate controversial, high-profile findings published in 2011.

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image: Those We Lost in 2016

Those We Lost in 2016

By | December 23, 2016

The scientific community bid farewell to several luminaries this year.

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image: Ignacio Tinoco, Luminary of RNA Folding, Dies

Ignacio Tinoco, Luminary of RNA Folding, Dies

By | December 20, 2016

The chemist shed light on ribonucleic acids’ secondary structures.

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image: Henry Heimlich, Maneuver Inventor, Dies

Henry Heimlich, Maneuver Inventor, Dies

By | December 20, 2016

The famed surgeon, whose signature maneuver to clear the blockage in a choking victim’s throat, helped save thousands of lives.

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image: Former WHO Director-General Dies

Former WHO Director-General Dies

By | December 16, 2016

Halfdan Mahler, the third leader of the World Health Organization, has passed away at age 93.

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image: Video: Watch Cells Crawl To Firmer Ground

Video: Watch Cells Crawl To Firmer Ground

By | December 11, 2016

This collective migration, called durotaxis, depends on which cells get the best grip on a surface.

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