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image: Single-Celled Life Primed to Go Multicellular

Single-Celled Life Primed to Go Multicellular

By | October 17, 2016

The unicellular ancestor of animals may have harbored some of the molecular tools that its many-celled descendants use to coordinate and direct cell differentiation and function, scientists show.

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image: Bridging a Gap in the Brain

Bridging a Gap in the Brain

By | October 12, 2016

Neuroscientists identify how the left and right hemispheres of the mammalian brain connect during development.

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image: Alzheimer’s Immunotherapy Pioneer Dies

Alzheimer’s Immunotherapy Pioneer Dies

By | October 11, 2016

Dale Schenk, who worked to develop a vaccine for Alzheimer’s disease, has passed away at age 59.

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image: Plant Biologist Killed in Ethiopian Protest

Plant Biologist Killed in Ethiopian Protest

By | October 6, 2016

Stone throwers hit the car Sharon Gray was riding in while visiting the country for a meeting.

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image: Influential Alzheimer’s Researcher Dies

Influential Alzheimer’s Researcher Dies

By | October 6, 2016

Allen Roses, a professor of neurobiology at Duke University School of Medicine, has passed away at age 73.

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image: Notable Science Quotes

Notable Science Quotes

By | October 1, 2016

Roger Tsien R.I.P., predatory publishing, and diversity in science

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image: How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine

How Plants Evolved Different Ways to Make Caffeine

By | September 21, 2016

Caffeine-producing plants use three different biochemical pathways and two different enzyme families to make the same molecule.

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image: Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

By | September 20, 2016

Egg and peanut consumption during infancy is linked to lower risk of allergy to those foods later in life, according to a meta-analysis.

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Scientists estimate the risk to fetuses exposed to the virus in utero.

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image: Stingrays Chew Too

Stingrays Chew Too

By | September 15, 2016

Researchers observe stingrays moving their jaws to grind up prey, a behavior thought to be restricted to mammals.

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