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image: Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

Further Support for Early-Life Allergen Exposure

By | September 20, 2016

Egg and peanut consumption during infancy is linked to lower risk of allergy to those foods later in life, according to a meta-analysis.

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Scientists estimate the risk to fetuses exposed to the virus in utero.

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image: Week in Review: August 29–September 2

Week in Review: August 29–September 2

By | September 2, 2016

Roger Tsien dies; the CRISPR patent dispute you’ve never heard of; immunotherapy for Alzheimer’s; Tasmanian devils developing resistance to transmissible cancer

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image: Nobel Laureate Roger Tsien Dies

Nobel Laureate Roger Tsien Dies

By | August 31, 2016

One of the pioneers in developing fluorescent proteins for biological studies was 64 years old.

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image: Epidemiologist Who Helped Eradicate Smallpox Dies

Epidemiologist Who Helped Eradicate Smallpox Dies

By | August 22, 2016

Donald Henderson, who led the World Health Organization’s fight against the disease in the 1960s and ’70s, has passed away at age 87.

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Disrupting the light/dark cycles of pregnant mice, researchers observe detrimental effects in the mouths of the animals’ pups.

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image: Biologist Who Communicated With Dolphins Dies

Biologist Who Communicated With Dolphins Dies

By | August 15, 2016

Louis Herman, who made seminal discoveries on dolphin cognition, has passed away at age 86.

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image: Nobel Laureate Dies

Nobel Laureate Dies

By | August 5, 2016

Chemist Ahmed Zewail, the “father of femtochemistry,” has passed away at age 70.

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image: Prominent Ecologist Dies

Prominent Ecologist Dies

By | June 16, 2016

Bob Paine, best known for introducing the idea of “keystone species,” has passed away at age 83.

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image: Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

Plastic Pollutants Can Harm Fish

By | June 6, 2016

European perch larvae exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of polystyrene particles preferred to eat the microplastics in place of prey, according to a study.

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