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image: Week in Review: August 29–September 2

Week in Review: August 29–September 2

By | September 2, 2016

Roger Tsien dies; the CRISPR patent dispute you’ve never heard of; immunotherapy for Alzheimer’s; Tasmanian devils developing resistance to transmissible cancer

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image: Promoting Protein Partnerships

Promoting Protein Partnerships

By | September 1, 2016

Scientists generate new protein-protein interactions at an impressive PACE.

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image: Protein or Perish

Protein or Perish

By | September 1, 2016

A bacteriophage must evolve certain variants of a protein or die.

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image: Nobel Laureate Roger Tsien Dies

Nobel Laureate Roger Tsien Dies

By | August 31, 2016

One of the pioneers in developing fluorescent proteins for biological studies was 64 years old.

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image: Epidemiologist Who Helped Eradicate Smallpox Dies

Epidemiologist Who Helped Eradicate Smallpox Dies

By | August 22, 2016

Donald Henderson, who led the World Health Organization’s fight against the disease in the 1960s and ’70s, has passed away at age 87.

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image: Extinct River Dolphin Species Discovered

Extinct River Dolphin Species Discovered

By | August 16, 2016

Overlooked for half a century, a skull in the Smithsonian collection points to a dolphin species that lived 25 million years ago, according to a study.

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image: Biologist Who Communicated With Dolphins Dies

Biologist Who Communicated With Dolphins Dies

By | August 15, 2016

Louis Herman, who made seminal discoveries on dolphin cognition, has passed away at age 86.

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image: Using RNA to Amplify RNA

Using RNA to Amplify RNA

By | August 15, 2016

Researchers apply in vitro evolution to generate an RNA enzyme capable of copying and amplifying RNA.

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image: Nobel Laureate Dies

Nobel Laureate Dies

By | August 5, 2016

Chemist Ahmed Zewail, the “father of femtochemistry,” has passed away at age 70.

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image: Nailing Down HAR Function

Nailing Down HAR Function

By | August 1, 2016

A remaining challenge in the study of human accelerated regions (HARs) is establishing their specific functions during development and other biological processes.

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