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image: Genetic Data Clarify Insect Evolution

Genetic Data Clarify Insect Evolution

By | November 6, 2014

Researchers create a phylogenetic tree of insects by comparing the sequences of 1,478 protein-coding genes among species.

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image: A Tale of Two Genitals

A Tale of Two Genitals

By | November 5, 2014

The genitalia of mammals and reptiles develop from two different tissues, but the structures share common genetic programs and molecular induction signals.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Walking Whales</em>

Book Excerpt from The Walking Whales

By | November 1, 2014

In Chapter 1, “Fossils and War,” author J.G.M. “Hans” Thewissen describes the difficulties of conducting field research in a conflict zone.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | November 1, 2014

Leonardo's Brain, The Future of the Brain, Dodging Extinction, and Arrival of the Fittest

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | November 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the November 2014 issue of The Scientist.

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image: The Ever-Transcendent Cell

The Ever-Transcendent Cell

By | November 1, 2014

Deriving physiologic first principles

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image: Walking with Whales

Walking with Whales

By | November 1, 2014

The history of cetaceans can serve as a model for both evolutionary dynamics and interdisciplinary collaboration.

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image: Leader in Birdsong Research Dies

Leader in Birdsong Research Dies

By | October 29, 2014

Allison Doupe, a neuroscientist known for her work exploring the neural mechanisms of learning, has passed away.

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image: Prominent Geomicrobiologist Dies

Prominent Geomicrobiologist Dies

By | October 29, 2014

Katrina Edwards, whose research focus was on discovering life beneath the ocean floor, has passed away at age 46.

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image: Rapid Evolution in Real Time

Rapid Evolution in Real Time

By | October 23, 2014

On islands off the coast of Florida, scientists uncover swift adaptive changes among Carolina anole populations, whose habitats were disturbed by the introduction of another lizard species.

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