The Scientist

» evolution, microbiology and neuroscience

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image: Trapped in Time

Trapped in Time

By | February 10, 2015

Ancient sulfur-eating deep-sea bacteria closely resemble modern variants, suggesting evolution may not occur in static environments.

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image: Subway Microbiome

Subway Microbiome

By | February 9, 2015

Researchers document the bacterial life living among New York City’s transit stations.


image: “Inner GPS” Support

“Inner GPS” Support

By | February 5, 2015

Grid cells—the neurons that function as a spatial navigation system—require input from another set of neurons, a rat study shows.


image: Bouncing Back

Bouncing Back

By | February 1, 2015

In mice, a transcriptional regulator, β-catenin, activates a microRNA-processing pathway in the nucleus accumbens to promote resilience to social stress.


image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2015

Touch, The Altruistic Brain, Is Shame Necessary?, and Future Arctic


image: Stubbornly Persistent

Stubbornly Persistent

By | February 1, 2015

Microorganisms continually challenge our assumptions of what life can achieve.

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image: The Energy of Life

The Energy of Life

By | February 1, 2015

Extremophiles should not be viewed through an anthropocentric lens; what’s extreme for us may be a perfectly comfortable environment for a microbe.


image: Contributors


By | February 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the February 2015 issue of The Scientist.


image: How Transposons Shaped Pregnancy

How Transposons Shaped Pregnancy

By | January 29, 2015

A mass migration of mobile regulatory elements increased the expression of thousands of genes in the uterus during the evolution of pregnancy.

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image: Brain Cells Behind Overeating

Brain Cells Behind Overeating

By | January 29, 2015

Scientists have defined mouse neurons responsible for excessive food consumption at an unprecedented level of detail. 

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