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image: Tippling Chimps Caught in the Act

Tippling Chimps Caught in the Act

By | June 10, 2015

Researchers in Africa observe chimpanzees stealing palm wine from villagers’ cups and imbibing the beverage.

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image: Spiky-Headed Dino Discovered

Spiky-Headed Dino Discovered

By | June 8, 2015

Dubbed “Hellboy,” the triceratops relative sports a bevy of horns on its crested cranium.

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image: The Roots of Schizophrenia

The Roots of Schizophrenia

By | June 4, 2015

Researchers link disease-associated mutations to excitatory and inhibitory signaling in the brain.

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image: Brain Drain

Brain Drain

By | June 1, 2015

The brain contains lymphatic vessels similar to those found elsewhere in the body, a mouse study shows.

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In the prologue, “Lemurs and the Delights of Fieldwork,” author Ian Tattersall shares the paleoanthropological lessons he learned from studying non-human primates in Madagascar.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | June 1, 2015

How to Clone a Mammoth, The Upright Thinkers, The Thirteenth Step, and Humankind

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | June 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the June 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: New Legs to Stand On

New Legs to Stand On

By | June 1, 2015

Reconstructing the past using ancient DNA

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image: Reimagining Humanity

Reimagining Humanity

By | June 1, 2015

As the science of paleoanthropology developed, human evolutionary trees changed as much as the minds that constructed them.

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image: Touchy Feely

Touchy Feely

By | June 1, 2015

Physical contact helps determine who’s present among baboons’ gut bacteria.

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