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image: The Necrobiome

The Necrobiome

By | February 1, 2014

Next-generation sequencing of the bacterial assemblages that inhabit a corpse throughout decomposition improve time-of-death estimates.

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image: Week in Review: January 27–31

Week in Review: January 27–31

By | January 31, 2014

Stimulus-triggered pluripotency; antioxidants speed lung tumor growth; the importance of seminal vesicles; how a plant pathogen jumps hosts

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image: Bacteria by Design

Bacteria by Design

By | January 30, 2014

A survey of bacteria in a University of Oregon building reveals that architecture influences the indoor microbiome.

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image: New River Dolphin

New River Dolphin

By | January 27, 2014

DNA sequencing study reveals a new river dolphin species in South America.

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image: Week in Review: January 20–24

Week in Review: January 20–24

By | January 24, 2014

Mistimed sleep disrupts human transcriptome; canine tumor genome; de novo Drosophila genes; UVA light lowers blood pressure; aquatic microfauna fight frog-killing fungus

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image: <em>Drosophila</em>’s New Genes

Drosophila’s New Genes

By | January 23, 2014

An analysis of the transcriptomes of several fruit fly strains reveals dozens of possible de novo genes in each.

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image: The Shared Perfumes of Queens

The Shared Perfumes of Queens

By | January 16, 2014

Ant, bee, and wasp queens emit a similar class of pheromones that sterilize their workers, hinting at a shared ancestry for these chemicals.

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image: Gut Microbes Prevent Locust Swarms

Gut Microbes Prevent Locust Swarms

By | January 15, 2014

Migratory locusts are less likely to aggregate into crop-devastating swarms when infected by the parasite Paranosema locustae.

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image: Clocks Versus Rocks

Clocks Versus Rocks

By | January 14, 2014

A new analysis suggests that placental mammals originated while dinosaurs were dominant, contradicting a recent high-profile study.

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image: Human-Pathogen Coevolution

Human-Pathogen Coevolution

By | January 13, 2014

Helicobacter pylori strains that share ancestry with their human hosts are less likely to cause severe disease.

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