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The Scientist

» evolution, neuroscience and immunology

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image: Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

Protein Clumps Spread Inflammation

By | June 22, 2014

ASC specks—protein aggregations that drive inflammation—are released from dying immune cells, expanding the reach of a defense response.

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image: Week in Review: June 16–20

Week in Review: June 16–20

By | June 20, 2014

Early Neanderthal evolution; developing antivirals to combat polio; the mouth and skin microbiomes; insect-inspired, flight-stabilizing sensors

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An examination of 17 ancient skulls shows that some Neanderthal features arose as far back as 430,000 years ago.

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image: Ancient Fish Analyzed

Ancient Fish Analyzed

By | June 13, 2014

Two paleontological findings yield insights into early vertebrate evolution.

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image: Snake Imitators Persist

Snake Imitators Persist

By | June 12, 2014

A harmless snake in the Carolina Sandhills has been mimicking a poisonous species for decades, and has become a better imitator since the latter went extinct.

2 Comments

image: Faces for Fighting?

Faces for Fighting?

By | June 10, 2014

Scientists propose that hominin facial bones evolved for protection against the powerful blows of combat.

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image: Ancient Apoptosis

Ancient Apoptosis

By | June 9, 2014

Humans and coral share a cell-death pathway that has been conserved between them for more than half a billion years.

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image: BRAIN Initiative Asks for $4.5B

BRAIN Initiative Asks for $4.5B

By | June 9, 2014

An advisory committee for the BRAIN Initiative says that to fully fund the goals of the neuroscience research program, taxpayers should fork over $4.5 billion.

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image: Leptin’s Effects

Leptin’s Effects

By | June 2, 2014

The hormone leptin, which signals fullness to animals, acts not only through neurons but through glia, too.

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>The Drunken Monkey</em>

Book Excerpt from The Drunken Monkey

By | June 1, 2014

In Chapter 3, "On the Inebriation of Elephants," author Robert Dudley considers whether tales of tipsy pachyderms and bombed baboons have any basis in scientific truth.

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