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» evolution, neuroscience and ecology

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image: Carnal Knowledge

Carnal Knowledge

By | July 1, 2014

Sex is an inherently fascinating aspect of life. As researchers learn more and more about it, surprises regularly emerge.

1 Comment

image: Geni-Tales

Geni-Tales

By | July 1, 2014

Penises and vaginas are not just simple sperm delivery and reception organs. They have been perfected by eons of sexual conflict.  

0 Comments

image: Laser-Guided Chastity

Laser-Guided Chastity

By | July 1, 2014

Scientists devise a precision-targeted system for training, tracking, and tweaking fruit fly social behavior.

0 Comments

image: Let’s Talk About Sex

Let’s Talk About Sex

By | July 1, 2014

In lieu of a career in punk rock, James Pfaus opted to study the brain signals underlying sexual behavior and then see what happened when he manipulated them.

2 Comments

image: Size Matters

Size Matters

By | July 1, 2014

The disproportionately endowed carabid beetle reveals that the size of female—and not just male—genitalia influences insemination success.

0 Comments

image: The Sex Paradox

The Sex Paradox

By | July 1, 2014

Birds do it. Bees do it. We do it. But not without a physical, biochemical, and genetic price. How did the costly practice of sex become so commonplace?

12 Comments

image: Sly Guys

Sly Guys

By | July 1, 2014

Across the animal kingdom, dominance isn’t the only way for a male to score. Colluding, sneaking around, or cross-dressing can work, too.

1 Comment

image: Emperor Penguins on Thin Ice

Emperor Penguins on Thin Ice

By | June 30, 2014

A new model suggests emperor penguin populations could decline by 19 percent by 2100.

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image: Mosquitoes Attracted to Malaria-Infected Mice

Mosquitoes Attracted to Malaria-Infected Mice

By | June 30, 2014

Mice infected with a malaria-causing parasite emit odors that are more attractive to malaria-transmitting mosquitoes than uninfected animals, a study shows.

2 Comments

image: Running Mice Regain Vision

Running Mice Regain Vision

By | June 27, 2014

Exposure to visual stimuli while running restores vision to mice blind in one eye. 

0 Comments

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