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image: Tricky Transfections

Tricky Transfections

By | March 1, 2015

A combination of microinjection and electroporation inserts genes into hard-to-reach cells.


image: Evolutionary Rewiring

Evolutionary Rewiring

By | February 26, 2015

Strong selective pressure can lead to rapid and reproducible evolution in bacteria.


image: Marine Life Trending Larger

Marine Life Trending Larger

By | February 23, 2015

Ocean animals have been getting bigger over the millennia, according to an analysis of thousands of genera that have plied Earth’s seas since the Cambrian Period.


image: Neuroscience of Marijuana Munchies

Neuroscience of Marijuana Munchies

By | February 18, 2015

Cannabinoids cause appetite-suppressing neurons to produce an appetite-stimulating hormone in mice.

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image: Two New Jurassic Mammals Found

Two New Jurassic Mammals Found

By | February 13, 2015

Researchers working in China have unearthed the fossil remains of two diminutive mammals that speak volumes about faunal diversity during the Jurassic Period.


image: Finch Findings

Finch Findings

By | February 12, 2015

Full genomes of Darwin’s Galápagos finches reveal a critical gene for beak shape and three overlooked species.

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image: Trapped in Time

Trapped in Time

By | February 10, 2015

Ancient sulfur-eating deep-sea bacteria closely resemble modern variants, suggesting evolution may not occur in static environments.

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image: “Inner GPS” Support

“Inner GPS” Support

By | February 5, 2015

Grid cells—the neurons that function as a spatial navigation system—require input from another set of neurons, a rat study shows.


image: Bouncing Back

Bouncing Back

By | February 1, 2015

In mice, a transcriptional regulator, β-catenin, activates a microRNA-processing pathway in the nucleus accumbens to promote resilience to social stress.


image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | February 1, 2015

Touch, The Altruistic Brain, Is Shame Necessary?, and Future Arctic


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