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image: New <em>Homo</em> Species Found

New Homo Species Found

By | September 10, 2015

Researchers describe H. naledi, an ancient human ancestor of unknown age that may have buried its dead.

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image: Can Amyloid Spread Between Brains?

Can Amyloid Spread Between Brains?

By | September 9, 2015

A study of deceased patients who received injections of cadaver-derived growth hormone hints at the possible transmissibility of Alzheimer’s disease. 

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image: Hearing Channel Components Mapped

Hearing Channel Components Mapped

By | September 4, 2015

Localization of two proteins important for inner ear hair cell function suggests they are part of the elusive mechanotransduction channel. 

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image: Mapping Corti

Mapping Corti

By | September 3, 2015

The inner ear organ, from macro to micro

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image: Hormone Affects “Runner’s High”

Hormone Affects “Runner’s High”

By | September 2, 2015

Leptin, the satiety hormone produced by fat, affects neuronal signaling in the mouse brain; interference with this pathway can influence the rewarding effects of running in the animals.

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By | September 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the September 2015 issue of The Scientist.

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image: Do Mine Ears Deceive Me?

Do Mine Ears Deceive Me?

By | September 1, 2015

A new approach shows how both honesty and deception are stable features of noisy communication.

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image: Dr. Hearing

Dr. Hearing

By | September 1, 2015

James Hudspeth talks brain processing and hearing in this video from Rockefeller University.

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image: Handicapable

Handicapable

By | September 1, 2015

Meet Tilak Ratnanather, the deaf biomedical engineer who mentors hard-of-hearing students headed for STEM careers.

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image: Hear and Now

Hear and Now

By | September 1, 2015

Auditory research advances worth shouting about

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