The Scientist

» evolution, immunology and disease/medicine

Most Recent

image: Week in Review: November 18–22

Week in Review: November 18–22

By | November 22, 2013

Chilly mice develop more tumors; gut bacteria aid cancer treatment; two Y chromosome genes sufficient for assisted reproduction; HIV’s “invisibility cloak”

0 Comments

image: Antifungal Permits Flu?

Antifungal Permits Flu?

By | November 21, 2013

A common fungus-fighting drug increases the susceptibility of mice to influenza infections.

0 Comments

image: Gut Flora Boost Cancer Therapies

Gut Flora Boost Cancer Therapies

By | November 21, 2013

Germ-free or antibiotic-treated mice fare worse than those with rich gut microbiomes during cancer treatment, two studies show.

2 Comments

image: It Takes Two

It Takes Two

By | November 21, 2013

Two genes from the Y chromosome are sufficient to generate male mice capable of fathering healthy offspring via an assisted reproductive technique.

1 Comment

image: Trouble for Darwin’s Frogs

Trouble for Darwin’s Frogs

By | November 21, 2013

Chytrid fungus has likely driven the decline of two South American frog species named for Charles Darwin.

0 Comments

image: HIV’s Stealth Revealed

HIV’s Stealth Revealed

By | November 21, 2013

HIV-1 evades the immune system with a protein shield, which can be lifted.

2 Comments

image: Hypochlorite Treats Inflammation

Hypochlorite Treats Inflammation

By | November 18, 2013

Scientists show that the active ingredient in bleach can reduce inflammation by targeting an activator of NF-κB.

0 Comments

image: Temperature-Dependent Immunity

Temperature-Dependent Immunity

By | November 18, 2013

Scientists show that mice housed at room temperature are less able to fight tumors.

8 Comments

image: Nipah Protein Structure Revealed

Nipah Protein Structure Revealed

By | November 18, 2013

The structure of a key protein of the deadly virus could serve as a stepping stone to antiviral therapy.

0 Comments

image: Ever Evolving <em>E. coli</em>

Ever Evolving E. coli

By | November 17, 2013

Scientists show that bacteria continue to become more fit, even over tens of thousands of generations.

20 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Exercise Boosts Telomere Transcription
  2. Neurons Compete to Form Memories
  3. Classic Example of Symbiosis Revised
  4. The Genetic Components of Rare Diseases
RayBiotech