The Scientist

» evolution and immunology

Most Recent

image: Using RNA to Amplify RNA

Using RNA to Amplify RNA

By | August 15, 2016

Researchers apply in vitro evolution to generate an RNA enzyme capable of copying and amplifying RNA.

1 Comment

image: Macrophages Respond to Liver Injury

Macrophages Respond to Liver Injury

By | August 1, 2016

In mice, immune cells from the body cavity surrounding organs arrive at the site of damage to chew up the nuclei of dead cells.

0 Comments

image: Nailing Down HAR Function

Nailing Down HAR Function

By | August 1, 2016

A remaining challenge in the study of human accelerated regions (HARs) is establishing their specific functions during development and other biological processes.

0 Comments

image: Newly Discovered Emergency Responders to Liver Damage

Newly Discovered Emergency Responders to Liver Damage

By | August 1, 2016

Immune cells called macrophages from the peritoneal cavity of mice migrate to injured livers and aid in repair.

0 Comments

image: On Becoming Human

On Becoming Human

By | August 1, 2016

Some thoughts on going to the Galápagos

1 Comment

image: Opinion: Monogamy and Cooperation Are Connected Through Multiple Links

Opinion: Monogamy and Cooperation Are Connected Through Multiple Links

By and | August 1, 2016

Why does cooperation evolve most often in monogamous animals?

2 Comments

image: Opinion: Our Inner Caveman

Opinion: Our Inner Caveman

By | August 1, 2016

The modern human brain evolved in social and environmental settings very unlike today’s. Despite our cultural and technological progress, tribal instincts remain.

2 Comments

A chloroplast mutation has dramatically affected the genomes of railside populations of Arabidopsis thaliana.

0 Comments

image: Understanding Human Accelerated Regions

Understanding Human Accelerated Regions

By | August 1, 2016

Fast-evolving regions of the human genome differentiate our species from all other mammals.

0 Comments

image: Decoding Human Accelerated Regions

Decoding Human Accelerated Regions

By | August 1, 2016

Do the portions of our genomes that set us apart from other animals hold the secret to human evolution?

6 Comments

Popular Now

  1. Decoding the Tripping Brain
  2. Tattoo Ink Nanoparticles Persist in Lymph Nodes
    The Nutshell Tattoo Ink Nanoparticles Persist in Lymph Nodes

    Analysis of the bodies of deceased individuals can’t determine what effect these tattoo remnants have on lymph function, but researchers suggest dirty needles aren’t the only risk of the age-old practice.

  3. Do Microbes Trigger Alzheimer’s Disease?
  4. Metabolomics Data Under Scrutiny
    Daily News Metabolomics Data Under Scrutiny

    Out of 25,000 features originally detected by metabolic profiling of E. coli, fewer than 1,000 represent unique metabolites, a study finds.

AAAS