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image: Platelets Fan Inflammation

Platelets Fan Inflammation

By | December 4, 2014

The circulating blood cells bind to neutrophils, prompting inflammation-related activity in these immune cell partners.


image: Gut Microbes Trigger Malaria-Fighting Antibodies

Gut Microbes Trigger Malaria-Fighting Antibodies

By | December 4, 2014

A carbohydrate antigen found on cells of E. coli and other species prompts a potent immune response against malaria-causing parasites in mice.

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image: Gene Jumped to All Three Domains of Life

Gene Jumped to All Three Domains of Life

By | December 1, 2014

By horizontal gene transfer, an antibacterial gene family has dispersed to a plant, an insect, several fungi, and an archaeon.

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image: All Systems Go

All Systems Go

By | December 1, 2014

Alan Aderem earned his PhD while under house arrest for protesting apartheid in South Africa. His early political involvement has guided his scientific focus, encouraging fellow systems biologists to study immunology and infectious diseases.


image: Bespoke Cell Jackets

Bespoke Cell Jackets

By | December 1, 2014

Scientists make hydrogel coats for individual cells that can be tailored to specific research questions.


image: Book Excerpt from <em>One Plus One Equals One</em>

Book Excerpt from One Plus One Equals One

By | December 1, 2014

In Chapter 7, “Green Evolution, Green Revolution,” author John Archibald describes how endosymbiosis helped color the Earth in a verdant hue.


image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | December 1, 2014

Your Atomic Self, Eureka!, A Talent for Friendship, and Undeniable


image: Mosquito Genomes Galore

Mosquito Genomes Galore

By | November 27, 2014

Whole-genome sequences of 16 different mosquito species reveal rapid evolution and could inform malaria research.

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image: Barley Key to Mankind’s Alpine Incursion

Barley Key to Mankind’s Alpine Incursion

By | November 24, 2014

The cold-tolerant cereal crop allowed humans to live and farm higher than ever starting more than 3,000 years ago.


image: When Males Kill Young

When Males Kill Young

By | November 13, 2014

Many social factors contributed to the evolution of male infanticide in mammal societies.



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