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Speaking of Science

By | March 1, 2013

March 2013's selection of notable quotes

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Science on Celluloid

By | February 28, 2013

Scientist? Filmmaker? Alexis Gambis welcomes both labels.

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image: Playing for Words

Playing for Words

By | February 28, 2013

Children with dyslexia have an easier time learning to read after playing action video games that don’t incorporate reading.

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image: Tadpoles See with Extra Eyes

Tadpoles See with Extra Eyes

By | February 27, 2013

Blind tadpoles regain vision when new eyes are grafted onto their tails. 

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image: Neurons Live Longer in New Brains

Neurons Live Longer in New Brains

By | February 25, 2013

Transplanting mouse neurons into rats allows the neurons to survive twice as long as they would in mice.

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image: Language Gene More Active in Girls

Language Gene More Active in Girls

By | February 21, 2013

One gene involved in speech produces more of its protein in the brains of young girls than boys.

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image: Opinion: Cooperating to Study Cooperation

Opinion: Cooperating to Study Cooperation

By | February 20, 2013

Physicists and biologists are working together to understand cooperation at all levels of life, from the cohesion of molecules to interspecies interactions.

7 Comments

image: Obama to Back Brain Mapping

Obama to Back Brain Mapping

By | February 18, 2013

A new project to map the activity of the human brain could receive more than $3 billion dollars in federal funds in President Obama’s upcoming budget proposal.

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image: Appendix Not Totally Useless

Appendix Not Totally Useless

By | February 15, 2013

The small organ evolved too many times for it to be an accident, but it’s still unclear what it does.

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image: MIT Lab Retracts Paper

MIT Lab Retracts Paper

By | February 15, 2013

A paper describing a new method for imaging synapse formation has been retracted after it emerged that the first author falsified data to prove its effectiveness.

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