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» evolution, culture and developmental biology

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image: Book Excerpt from <em>Living Color</em>

Book Excerpt from Living Color

By | October 1, 2012

In Chapter 3, "Out of the Tropics," author Nina G. Jablonski, explores the genes behind skin pigmentation and makes the distinction between color and race.

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image: Gone Missing, circa 1892

Gone Missing, circa 1892

By | October 1, 2012

A unique organism sighted only once, more than a century ago, could shed light on the evolution of multicellularity—if it ever actually existed.

3 Comments

image: Home Cookin’

Home Cookin’

By | October 1, 2012

Laboratory-raised populations of dung beetles reveal a mother's extragenetic influence on the physiques of her sons.

2 Comments

image: Lamarck and the Missing Lnc

Lamarck and the Missing Lnc

By | October 1, 2012

Epigenetic changes accrued over an organism’s lifetime may leave a permanent heritable mark on the genome, through the help of long noncoding RNAs.

21 Comments

image: Pixel Perfect

Pixel Perfect

By | October 1, 2012

Presenting the best life science images and videos of 2012

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image: True Colors

True Colors

By | October 1, 2012

The biological and social ramifications of skin pigmentation are too often ignored by scientists, teachers, and the general public.

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image: Evolving Dependence

Evolving Dependence

By | September 27, 2012

Scientists unravel the confusing molecular biology behind a fruit fly’s reliance on a single type of cactus.

1 Comment

image: Solving Irreproducible Science

Solving Irreproducible Science

By | September 26, 2012

Will the recently launched Reproducibility Initiative succeed in cleaning up research and reducing retractions?

12 Comments

image: Opinion: Cell Phone Health Risk?

Opinion: Cell Phone Health Risk?

By | September 25, 2012

Security concerns during the Cold War may have led to the generation of misinformation on the physiological effects of microwave radiation from mobile phones.

13 Comments

image: Gender Bias when Hiring Scientists

Gender Bias when Hiring Scientists

By | September 21, 2012

Both male and female researchers are less likely to hire a female candidate than a male candidate with the same experience.

3 Comments

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