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image: Week in Review: April 28–May 2

Week in Review: April 28–May 2

By | May 2, 2014

Male scientists stress mice out; using SCNT to reprogram adult cells; acetate can reach mouse brain, reduce appetite; WHO sounds “post-antibiotic era” alarm

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image: Not So Different

Not So Different

By | May 1, 2014

Researchers unearth little evidence to suggest modern humans are superior to their Neanderthal ancestors.

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image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | May 1, 2014

Madness and Memory, Promoting the Planck Club, The Carnivore Way, and The Tale of the Dueling Neurosurgeons

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image: Contributors

Contributors

By and | May 1, 2014

Meet some of the people featured in the May 2014 issue of The Scientist

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image: Hear Ye, Hear Ye

Hear Ye, Hear Ye

By | May 1, 2014

Tools for tracking quorum-sensing signals in bacterial colonies

2 Comments

image: Sophie Dumont: Forces at Play

Sophie Dumont: Forces at Play

By | May 1, 2014

Assistant Professor, Department of Cell & Tissue Biology, University of California, San Francisco. Age: 38

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image: The Skin We’re In

The Skin We’re In

By | May 1, 2014

Beneath maladies of the skin lie psychosocial stigma and pain.

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image: A Wilder Europe

A Wilder Europe

By | May 1, 2014

An organization hopes to restore natural ecological processes by reintroducing large herbivores to the continent.

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image: Neuroaesthetics

Neuroaesthetics

By | May 1, 2014

Researchers unravel the biology of beauty and art.

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image: Where the Wild Things Were

Where the Wild Things Were

By | May 1, 2014

Conservationists are reintroducing large animals to areas they once roamed, providing ecologists with the chance to assess whether such “rewilding” efforts can restore lost ecosystems.

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