The Scientist

» evolution, disease/medicine and microbiology

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image: Icy Veins

Icy Veins

By | April 2, 2013

Intrepid Norwegian explorers discovered the Antarctic icefish, a marvel of evolution, while venturing to an island at the bottom of the Earth in 1927.



"White-Blooded" Icefish, 1927

By | April 1, 2013

A bizarre group of Antarctic fishes lost their red blood cells but survived to tell their evolutionary tale, revealing a fundamental lesson about the birth and death of genes.


image: Book Excerpt from Rough and Tumble

Book Excerpt from Rough and Tumble

By | April 1, 2013

In Chapter 3, “Tamping the Simian Urge,” author Travis Rayne Pickering contrasts the brute physicality of predatory chimpanzees with the headier hunting style employed by humans.


image: Cancer Clinical Trials of Tomorrow

Cancer Clinical Trials of Tomorrow

By | April 1, 2013

Advances in genomics and cancer biology will alter the design of human cancer studies.


image: Capsule Reviews

Capsule Reviews

By | April 1, 2013

Leopold, The Drunken Botanist, Beautiful Whale, and Between Man and Beast


image: Contributors


By | April 1, 2013

Meet some of the people featured in the April 2013 issue of The Scientist.


image: Making Cancer More Transparent

Making Cancer More Transparent

By | April 1, 2013

A decade into the age of genomics, science is generating a flood of data that will help in the quest to eradicate the disease.


image: Sarkis Mazmanian: Microbe Machinist

Sarkis Mazmanian: Microbe Machinist

By | April 1, 2013

Professor, Division of Biology, California Institute of Technology. Age: 40


image: The Roots of Violence

The Roots of Violence

By | April 1, 2013

Archaeology can shine needed light on the evolution of our aggressive tendencies.


image: Up, Up, and Array

Up, Up, and Array

By | April 1, 2013

By scrutinizing gene expression profiles instead of individual oncogenes, Todd Golub launched a powerful platform for diagnosing, classifying, and treating cancer.

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