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image: Human Ancestors?

Human Ancestors?

By | April 11, 2013

Fossilized skeletal remains of the hominid Australopithecus sediba add to the puzzle of human evolution.

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image: “Breathprints” Could Diagnose Disease

“Breathprints” Could Diagnose Disease

By | April 5, 2013

Researchers can identify individuals by the unique chemical signatures in their breath, suggesting that exhalations could be used for metabolomic tests.

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image: Week in Review: April 1-5

Week in Review: April 1-5

By | April 5, 2013

Living fossils not so fossilized; Canadian gov’t threatens scientists’ freedom to speak and publish; gene therapy for sensory disorders; an unusual theory of cancer; clues for an HIV vaccine

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image: Review: Gossamer Gallants

Review: Gossamer Gallants

By | April 5, 2013

The insect-inspired dance by choreographer Paul Taylor strikes the perfect balance between six-legged realism and artistic fancy.

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image: Cancer Growth Curtailed

Cancer Growth Curtailed

By | April 4, 2013

Researchers develop two small molecules that slow the growth of human cancer cells.

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image: Roadmap to an HIV Vaccine

Roadmap to an HIV Vaccine

By | April 3, 2013

Researchers track the evolution of HIV in a single patient to understand what drives the production of broadly neutralizing antibodies.

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image: The Falsity of Living Fossils

The Falsity of Living Fossils

By | April 2, 2013

New studies of tadpole shrimp and other organisms show that the term “living fossil” is inaccurate and misleading.

5 Comments

image: Icy Veins

Icy Veins

By | April 2, 2013

Intrepid Norwegian explorers discovered the Antarctic icefish, a marvel of evolution, while venturing to an island at the bottom of the Earth in 1927.

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image:

"White-Blooded" Icefish, 1927

By | April 1, 2013

A bizarre group of Antarctic fishes lost their red blood cells but survived to tell their evolutionary tale, revealing a fundamental lesson about the birth and death of genes.

5 Comments

image: Book Excerpt from Rough and Tumble

Book Excerpt from Rough and Tumble

By | April 1, 2013

In Chapter 3, “Tamping the Simian Urge,” author Travis Rayne Pickering contrasts the brute physicality of predatory chimpanzees with the headier hunting style employed by humans.

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