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image: The Energizer

The Energizer

By | May 1, 2014

György Hajnóczky uncovers the chemical and physical strategies by which mitochondria communicate and function within a cell.

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image: The Youngest Victims

The Youngest Victims

By | May 1, 2014

Linking single-gene defects to inflammatory bowel disease in young children may help all sufferers of the illness.

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image: Your Brain on Art

Your Brain on Art

By | May 1, 2014

A new scientific discipline investigates the neurology underlying the experience and the creation of beauty.

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image: A Wilder Europe

A Wilder Europe

By | May 1, 2014

An organization hopes to restore natural ecological processes by reintroducing large herbivores to the continent.

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Neuroaesthetics

By | May 1, 2014

Researchers unravel the biology of beauty and art.

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image: The Art of Brain Damage

The Art of Brain Damage

By | May 1, 2014

Artist Katherine Sherwood discuss how suffering a cerebral hemorrhage affected her work.

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image: Where the Wild Things Were

Where the Wild Things Were

By | May 1, 2014

Conservationists are reintroducing large animals to areas they once roamed, providing ecologists with the chance to assess whether such “rewilding” efforts can restore lost ecosystems.

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Inactive Actin

By | May 1, 2014

Clathrin-mediated endocytosis shuts down during mitosis in eukaryotic cells because all of the required actin is hoarded by the cytoskeleton.

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image: Rare Fat Keeps Fly from Freezing

Rare Fat Keeps Fly from Freezing

By | April 30, 2014

Researchers report the first evidence of cryopreservation by an overwintering insect in which stores of an uncommon lipid are critical.

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image: Another Way Fiber Is Filling

Another Way Fiber Is Filling

By | April 29, 2014

Acetate, a short-chain fatty acid released following the fermentation of dietary fiber in the gut, accumulates in the brain and can affect appetite in mice.

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