Most Recent

image: Spinoff Company to Develop Rare Disease Drugs

Spinoff Company to Develop Rare Disease Drugs

By | January 7, 2015

Maryland-based Vtesse will work with the US National Institutes of Health to advance treatments for Niemann-Pick Type C disease and other lysosomal storage disorders.

1 Comment

image: New Antibiotic from Soil Bacteria

New Antibiotic from Soil Bacteria

By | January 7, 2015

Researchers have isolated a new kind of antibiotic from a previously unknown and uncultured bacterial genus.  

3 Comments

image: 23andMe, Genentech Partner on Parkinson’s

23andMe, Genentech Partner on Parkinson’s

By | January 7, 2015

Firms enter a multi-year deal for the analysis of whole-genome sequence data, with an eye toward drug discovery for Parkinson’s disease.

0 Comments

image: Custom Creatures?

Custom Creatures?

By | January 6, 2015

San Francisco-based biotech wants to see its technology applied for inventing new organisms.

0 Comments

image: Contributors

Contributors

By | January 1, 2015

Meet some of the people featured in the January 2015 issue of The Scientist.

0 Comments

image: Doris Bachtrog: Sex Chromosome Wrangler

Doris Bachtrog: Sex Chromosome Wrangler

By | January 1, 2015

Associate Professor, Department of Integrative Biology, University of California, Berkeley. Age: 39

0 Comments

image: Funding Research in Africa

Funding Research in Africa

By | January 1, 2015

The ongoing Ebola epidemic in West Africa is drawing more money to study the virus, but what about funding for African science in general?

2 Comments

image: Performance Art

Performance Art

By | January 1, 2015

Regulation of genome expression orchestrates the behavior of insect castes and the human response to social stress.

0 Comments

image: Why, Oh Y?

Why, Oh Y?

By | January 1, 2015

A toothpick and a bit of chance shaped David Page’s career, which he has dedicated to understanding the mammalian Y chromosome and fetal germ cell development.

0 Comments

image: Stress Fractures

Stress Fractures

By | January 1, 2015

Social adversity shapes humans’ immune systems—and probably their susceptibility to disease—by altering the expression of large groups of genes.

6 Comments

Popular Now

  1. First In Vivo Function Found for Animal Circular RNA
  2. Your Body Is Teeming with Weed Receptors
    Features Your Body Is Teeming with Weed Receptors

    And the same endocannabinoid system that translates marijuana's buzz-inducing compounds into a high plays crucial roles in health and disease outside the brain.

  3. Opinion: We Need a Replacement for Beall’s List
  4. Doctors’ Advice to Finish Antibiotics Overlooks Resistance
AAAS