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image: The Shared Perfumes of Queens

The Shared Perfumes of Queens

By | January 16, 2014

Ant, bee, and wasp queens emit a similar class of pheromones that sterilize their workers, hinting at a shared ancestry for these chemicals.

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image: Clocks Versus Rocks

Clocks Versus Rocks

By | January 14, 2014

A new analysis suggests that placental mammals originated while dinosaurs were dominant, contradicting a recent high-profile study.

3 Comments

image: Fewer Female Snail Penises

Fewer Female Snail Penises

By | January 14, 2014

Researchers are now spotting fewer cases of imposex—in which female sea snails develop male sexual organs—as a result of a chemical ban instituted in 2008.

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image: Human-Pathogen Coevolution

Human-Pathogen Coevolution

By | January 13, 2014

Helicobacter pylori strains that share ancestry with their human hosts are less likely to cause severe disease.

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image: Large Carnivores Under Siege

Large Carnivores Under Siege

By | January 13, 2014

As populations of top predators decline in ecosystems the world over, researchers chart the widespread effects.

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image: First North American H5N1 Death

First North American H5N1 Death

By | January 9, 2014

A person in Canada has died of the first confirmed human case of H5N1 avian flu in North America.

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image: Settlement Signal

Settlement Signal

By | January 9, 2014

A marine bacterium generates contractile structures that are essential for the metamorphosis of a tubeworm.

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image: Schizophrenia’s Jumping Genetics

Schizophrenia’s Jumping Genetics

By | January 6, 2014

Researchers find evidence that transposable elements, also known as jumping genes, may contribute to the development of the psychiatric disorder.

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image: Book Excerpt from The Monkey’s Voyage

Book Excerpt from The Monkey’s Voyage

By | January 1, 2014

In Chapter 7, “The Green Web,” author Alan de Queiroz describes the evolutionary journey taken by a South American species of sundew plant.

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image: Drawn to Controversy

Drawn to Controversy

By | January 1, 2014

By digging through dusty storerooms and reading dead people’s mail, science historian and philosopher Michael Dietrich keeps biologists attuned to the past and mindful of the present.

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